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Sample Anti-Mental Health and Anti-Psychiatry State Legislation from Previous Sessions

Arizona SB1248
Requires public records to be available regarding the use of psychotropic medications for children. The bill threatens to violate the privacy of children and families and it is not clear how this information might be used and whether the information will be used for improper purposes (2007 Session - Failed).

Florida SB2286
Sets forth the contents of a consent statement that families must sign before their child is evaluated for an emotional, behavioral, mental disorder, a specific learning disability, or other health impairment. It is clear that the language included in the consent form is designed to discourage families from having their child evaluated for mental health related concerns and uses fear to discourage families from considering the use of medication to treat mental disorders (2006 Session - Failed). (See the Florida SB2286 Letter to the Senate  in the State Advocacy Toolkit).

New Hampshire HB164
Threatens open communication between schools and families about mental health related concerns by requiring
each school board or cooperative school board to adopt and implement a policy prohibiting school personnel from recommending the use of psychotropic medications for any child.  School professionals should not recommend any medications for students, this bill singles out psychotropic medications and appears designed to discourage open communication about legitimate mental health related concerns  (2007 Session - Failed). (
See the New Hampshire HB164 Letter to the Senate in the State Advocacy Toolkit).

New York A3795
Threatens open communication between schools and families about mental health related concerns by requiring the commissioner of education to establish rules and regulations prohibiting school personnel from recommending psychotropic medication for children.  School professionals should not recommend any medications for students, this bill singles out psychotropic medications and appears designed to discourage open communication about legitimate mental health related concerns (2007 Session – In Progress).

Utah HB202
Threatens open communication between schools and families by prohibiting school personnel from making recommendations for a student, including the use of psychotropic medications, and prohibits removal of a child from parental custody based on a parent’s refusal to consent to the administration of psychotropic medications.  The bill singles out psychotropic medications as an issue that may not be discussed with families (2007 Session - Passed). (See the Utah HB202 Letter to the Governor   and the HB202 Op-Ed in the State Advocacy Toolkit).

Utah HB299
Threatens open communication between schools and families about mental health related concerns by prohibiting school personnel from making certain medical recommendations for a minor, including the use pf psychotropic medications, and prohibits consideration of a petition for removal of a minor, and removal of a minor from parental custody based on a parent’s refusal to consent to the administration of psychotropic medications. School professionals should not recommend any medications for students, but this bill singles out psychotropic medications and appears designed to discourage open communication about legitimate mental health related concerns (Session 2006 - Failed). (See HB299 Op-Ed in the State Advocacy Toolkit).


 

 

 


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