In the News

Schools nationwide are offering mental health days to address growing issues among teens
Posted on Oct 24 2019
Yahoo! Lifestyle
NAMI mentioned
Reports the latest endeavor of Generation Z to enact mental health days in schools nationwide. Jennifer Rothman, senior manager of youth and young adult initiatives at NAMI, says it’s this awareness among teens that is fueling the change nationwide. 
Stop The Stigma: Student Groups, Professionals Pushing To Raise Awareness On Mental Illness Treatment
Posted on Oct 23 2019
CBS News
NAMI mentioned
Video segment about Cecilia McGough and her group, Students With Schizophrenia, that includes an interview of Angela Kimball, acting CEO.
Mental health resources: How to get help for yourself or your loved ones
Posted on Oct 23 2019
CBS This Morning
NAMI mentioned
Highlights where to learn more about mental health and finding support. Provides a link to the NAMI program webpage.
Stop The Stigma: A Conversation About Mental Health
Posted on Oct 23 2019
CBS This Morning
NAMI highlighted
In an effort to help break down stigmas surrounding mental health, CBS This Morning did a special 1-hour live broadcast focused on mental illness, “Stop the Stigma” which featured Ken Duckworth, NAMI medical director, in two segments on the show.
Schools now letting students stay home sick for mental-health days
Posted on Oct 22 2019
Washington Post
NAMI mentioned
In the face of rising rates of depression, anxiety and suicide among young people, some states and school systems have started allowing students to take mental sick days off from school. Last year, Utah changed its definition of valid excuses for absences to include mental health issues. This summer, Oregon enacted a law that allows students to take days off for mental health. Students in other states, including Colorado, Florida and Washington, are attempting to get similar laws passed.
How to talk about mental health, according to the experts
Posted on Oct 22 2019
CBS This Morning
NAMI mentioned
Reports that when talking about mental health, language matters. Additionally, don't refer to people as their illnesses by saying someone is schizophrenic, someone is bipolar, or someone is mentally ill, says Teri Brister of NAMI.
Suicide Attempts Rising Among Black Teens
Posted on Oct 14 2019
HealthDay
NAMI mentioned
Historically, black teenagers in the U.S. have had lower suicide rates than whites. But a new study in Pediatrics finds that more black teens have been attempting suicide in recent years and experts are not sure why. 
How to Improve Youth Mental Health Outcomes, According to an Expert
Posted on Oct 10 2019
Thrive Global
NAMI mentioned
Editorial Piece by Ken Duckworth, medical director, about a session at the World Economic Forum focused on youth mental health called “Building the Mental Wealth of Young People Globally.” This session was part of a larger goal of improving mental health outcomes across the globe. Youth mental health — including prevention, early support, and services — plays a key role.
Trump's claims and what experts say about mental illness and mass shootings
Posted on Aug 23 2019
ABC News
NAMI mentioned
Reports that under pressure to take action, the president has repeatedly tried to shift the cause of mass shootings away from guns and toward mental illness. There was strong reaction as well from NAMI acting CEO Angela Kimball. "The president should be talking about better care and earlier access to intensive treatment, not revisiting the shameful institutions of our past," she said in a statement. "Words matter, Mr. President. 'These people' are our friends, neighbors, children, spouses. They're not 'monsters,' 'the mentally ill' or 'crazy people' -- they're us. Talking about reinstitutionalization only further marginalizes and isolates the 1 in 5 people with mental illness. Instead, we need to be talking about the power of early treatment and effective intervention to change lives," she said.
'Trauma Doesn’t Go Away By Itself.' How El Paso Is Tackling Mental Health Stigma After the Walmart Mass Shooting
Posted on Aug 20 2019
TIME
NAMI mentioned
Reports that since the mass shooting at Walmart in El Paso, those working in the mental health care field say there has been increasing demand for their services and they believe it may be a turning point in public perception. “It can span from religion, to the belief that [mental illness] just doesn’t exist, or a ‘people just need to get over it’ attitude — sort of machismo culture where you don’t admit anything’s wrong with you, you’re not allowed to cry and you just have to get over something,” says Isidro Torres, director of outreach and fundraising, NAMI El Paso, which has for decades attempted to reduce the stigma in the area. Torres says more resources can help everyone.
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